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Monthly Updates by Dennis Daudelin, Publisher


  • New Woodturning Books
  • Laurel family trees in danger
  • Open call for exhibition proposals
  • Traveling Exhibition
  • Maine Wood Award Winners
  • Price Roll-back at Marc Adams School of Woodworking
  • Free Shipping at Rockler
  • Top 20 Most-Viewed New Woodturning Videos for February 2018


Turning Stone by Guy Michaels

Like many others, I had my first turning experience in high school but then work, life and family took priority. I was lucky that I was able to get back to the lathe when I was 29. I soon started selling my wood turnings at art festivals. However, I kept looking for a way to make my turning unique and appealing. On a whim, I tried a piece of alabaster stone, and I have never turned back. I’ve now been a production stone turner for the last 25 years.



The Basics of Casting with a Two-part Resin by Sam Angelo

The origins of turning on a lathe may go back a few thousand years or more. This history is neither complete nor definitive in every respect, especially in identifying the first material ever turned--which may or may not have been wood. Four or five thousand years ago Egyptians turned alabaster, basalt, and granite. So the earliest evidence of a lathe-turned object is most likely stone, not wood. To put it simply, wood rots, is destroyed by fire, and by its very nature does not last very long in a harsh environment.  



The Pen Turner's Corner: One-Piece Perfect Fit Convertible by Don Ward

I have written about making one piece pens using twist ballpoint kits such as the 7mm slimlines that use Cross® style refills. One-piece pens can also be made using twist ballpoint kits that use the Parker® style refill. The cigar pen is one I’ve written about making. My favorite twist ballpoint using the Parker® refill is the Perfect Fit Convertible sold by Berea Hardwoods and Berea resellers ( 




Painted Natural Edge Bowls by John Lucas

Have you ever started a bark edge bowl and had trouble keeping the bark on? Maybe the blank was too old, or bugs got into the cambium layer, or maybe you just got too aggressive with the gouge and tore it off. Happens to us all. Early on after having this problem I learned to either color the edge with a permanent marker, or burn the edge. Of course you had to remove all the bark to do this. In this article I will show you the techniques for removing the bark and what I think is a more unusual and maybe better alternative to burning. 


Making a Square to Octagon Gauge by David Reed Smith

This is admittedly a specialized project. But if you often turn face grain mounted work from square stock (such as salad bowls, or in my case, drop spindle whorls) it can save you time. For face grain work less than 8” in diameter it’s sufficient to bandsaw off the corners rather than saw the stock to a disc. For small discs it’s often easier to saw an octagon than to cut a circle, particularly if you routinely keep a monster blade on your bandsaw. Guessing at how much corner to remove can result in extra turning work or undersize discs.  The STO-Gauge (Square To Octagon) lets you quickly mark the corners for removal and also mark the center of the square. You only have to set the slide on the gauge to the size of the square on a scale.


Creating your very own Dibble/Whacker by Bob Heltman

The dibble, according to one source, was invented by Charles Waistell, of High Holborn, London, around 1811.This device is also known as a "dibber" or "dibbler", and was probably invented thousands of years earlier by an unnamed farmer who used a marked stick to plant bulbs at a proper depth.


Meet the Turner:

Nigel Howe, Berkley, MA

Test Your Knowledge:

Woodturning 101

New Products:

  • Bowl Turner's Tool Rest by Rockler
  • Box Scraper by Cindy Drozda
  • Beall Wood Threader 3.0
  • The New NOVA App
  • Parafix 3408 CA by Parson Adhesives
  • Origin by Shaper Tools

Questions and Answers: Turning structurally unsound wood

Product Reviews: Travel Pack

Monthly Updates by Dennis Daudelin, Publisher


  • 2018 Wharton Esherick Museum Competition
  • Call for entries: Design in Wood Exhibition
  • Ornament Challenge Update
  • TV's Handcrafted America features pen maker
  • Opportunities for Educators
  • Folk School open for 2018 registration
  • Legendary woodworker passes on
  • Top 20 Most-Viewed New Woodturning Videos for January 2018


Turning a Nostalgic Oil Can by Dennis Daudelin

I was inspired by Sam Angelo’s article in More Woodturning Magazine’s April 2017 edition titled “Exploring Color with Metal Reactive Paint”. Sam showed how to use the new metal reactive paints (VerDay Paint) from Ten Seconds Studio to embellish some turned bowls and hollow forms. The colors available are brass, copper, bronze and iron. I really enjoyed seeing the different patinas that were possible with this system, and wanted to apply this finish to something different than Sam’s bowls and hollow forms. So, I noodled over ideas on what to turn. I tried to think of an item that is made from metal but is round enough to be turned on the lathe (out of wood) and then embellished to make it look like metal. So, I came up with a “faux metal” turning.



Baseball Bat Pens by David Budnik

I was looking for a simple turning project that I could use at demos and have something inexpensive enough to give away. Steve Walsh taught me how to turn these baseball bat pens at Sun-n-Fun RV Park in Sarasota, Florida and they turned out to be ideal for my purpose.



The Pen Turner's Corner: Pen and Pencil Set by Don Ward

This month’s pen, actually pens, well, actually a pen and pencil set, will accomplish several objectives. The pen and pencil set will be made using maple flooring from the basketball court at the high school gym where I taught. The gym was destroyed by a severe storm in 2003 and I salvaged a few hundred feet of the figured maple boards before they went to the dump--70,000 linear feet sent to the landfill. I sure wished I’d had a place to store it! The boards are 1” thick, tongue and grooved flooring. The gym was built in 1962. The maple flooring is yielding beautiful pens and I’ve sold several to former students who played in the gym on that floor. So, one objective of this month’s article is to make readers aware of free wood or wood that has some sort of historic or sentimental value. Be on the lookout in your community for buildings being torn down, trees being trimmed or removed, and other sources for wood that would otherwise be taken to the dump. I’ve made pens from bowling pins, baseball bats, furniture pieces, a couple’s first Christmas tree, 35 year old tree houses, barn beams, wooden golf club shafts, trees from various local government buildings, wood from other buildings, and similar sources. I just recently cut 100 bowl blanks from mesquite trees pushed into piles to make way for a new housing development. The pieces I trimmed off when making the bowl blanks made another 125 pen blanks. Be sure to obtain permission before harvesting.




How to Dry Green Wood - Microwave Oven Process by Paul Rohrbacher

Some wood turners rough turn a great quantity of bowl blanks, seal them, and stack them to dry over many months to years. Wood that is very slowly dried from the outside into the inside shouldn‘t crack: however, when green wood is exposed to the air, the outside wood dries and shrinks faster than the inside wood, thus the wood cracks.


How to Sharpen a Scraper and How it Works by John Wolf

I recently had the opportunity to visit with a tool maker and sharpening expert. I agreed with his views on things until he started talking about scrapers. His view is that scrapers work because of the hook edge – the burr. This doesn't hold up well and therefore need to be sharpened after about 45 seconds of use. A quick light touch to the grinder is all that is necessary to sharpen the edge and recreate the burr.


Creating a Spaceship Top by Bob Heltman

An article or two ago I wrote about a triple purpose combo turning that makes a top, a tree ornament, and a wine bottle stopper – the OrnasTOPper.  That experience propelled me into this creation, a rotating spaceship top.


Meet the Turner:

Bill Bulloch, Griffin, GA

Test Your Knowledge:

What wood is this?

New Products:

  • No Press Pen Kits from Penn State Industries
  • Carbide Teardrop Cutter by AZ Carbide
  • Pen Blank Cutting Fixture by Tim Geist
  • Wireless Speaker Kit by Rockler
  • Three New Curved Tool Rests from Nova
  • New Arbor Press from Berea Hardwoods

Questions and Answers: Turning green bowl to a thin wall and finish

Product Reviews: Pen Blank Cutting Fixture

Monthly Updates by Dennis Daudelin, Publisher


  • Big Tree Program
  • New Location for David Ellsworth
  • Peters Valley School of Craft Announces Summer Workshops
  • Crafty crows make their own tools
  • Ornament idea for next year
  • The Museum of Arts and Design announces the Burke Prize
  • Top 20 Most-Viewed New Woodturning Videos for December 2017


Stone Inlay in Woodturning by Robert Bley

As we know, there are so many ways of embellishing our turnings. Using stone to decorate our turnings or even fill cracks can add a beautiful new dimension to our projects. In this article, I will share with you a few different ways and techniques to utilize stone in your work. Note: throughout this article, whenever I refer to stone, this also applies to other materials like abalone, mother of pearl, mica, metal filings, pewter, coffee grinds, wood dust, bark, Corian® and a host of other filler options. Sometimes your piece stands alone and does not need any embellishment. However, sometimes adding stone can take a simple piece to a new level.



Designing and Turning Laminated Handles by Frank Penta

Designing and turning laminated handles for utensils can be very exciting. There is an infinite combination of wood colors, character, and veneers to mix and match to create interesting designs. I have found that laminated handles are not only fun to turn, but sell quite well.



The Pen Turner's Corner: Alternative Materials for Pens by Don Ward

Most of the articles I’ve written have instructed how to make a particular pen using wood as the primary material. There are other materials that can be used to make pens. Although wood is my favorite, I do make pens from various plastics, antler, and my favorite non-wood pen material is snakeskin over cast with polyester resin. Although snakeskin blanks are available from several sources, I can control the quality of the skin, the resin used and the encapsulating or casting process when I cast the blanks myself.




What Steel Gets Sharpest by John Lucas

This is a debate that goes on forever. Ever since I started wood working, people have been arguing about which steel gets the sharpest. Thirty-five years ago it was pretty well accepted that high carbon steel would get sharper and carbide simply would not get to a keen edge. Well, things have changed. I recently heard someone echo the statement that high carbon steel would get sharper and particle metal steel would not get sharp. Well, I was pretty sure that might not be true anymore. A few years ago I did a test on skews and how they are ground. I didn’t plan it that way, but it turns out I had skews made from all sorts of steels. They all seemed to take an edge well enough to shave hair. This led me to doubt the earlier statement. So I set out to see if I could prove it one way or the other.


An alternative chucking method by Dick Veitch

When cutting the chuck bite off the bottom, hollow forms of the shape shown here can be held in a vacuum chuck or pressed to a large cup chuck by the tailstock. If the body of the work has been textured and pierced, a vacuum chuck will not work and tailstock pressure may be too much for the remaining wood. Gluing the piece into a cup chuck is an option, but glue may mark the decorated surface or break fine filaments of the work. The method shown here has been developed to reduce the possibility of breaking and leave less marking on the finished surface.


Sloped Rim Bowl by Bob Heltman

First, put a medium sized zip lock bag in the pocket of every pair of pants you wear to a hardware or home improvement store. When at such a store go to the key making location, find the staff person in charge, and ask if you might have some of the brass cuttings from key making. Most times they will be glad to help you.


Meet the Turner:

Jim Silva, West Wareham, MA

Test Your Knowledge:

Organizing your shop

New Products:

  • Viceroy Tools by Hunter Tool Systems
  • Elbo Lathe Extension for Short Bed and Mini Lathes by Tim Yoder
  • Sanding Sleeves by Saburrtooth
  • Rikon 4-Piece Carbide Insert Woodturning Set
  • Stainless Steel Tableware from Craft Supplies
  • Mobile Base for your Lathe by BoraTool
  • Atracia Family Pen Kits by Berea
  • Pearl Topped European Ballpoint by Berea

Questions and Answers: Live Remote Demonstrations

Product Reviews: Viceroy Tools